AT Visitor Center

THE MONSON APPALACHIAN TRAIL VISITOR CENTER

Appalachian Trail Visitor Center

  • HIKER INFORMATION
  • TRAIL MAPS & RESOURCES
  • TRAIL CONDITION UPDATES
  • BAXTER STATE PARK INFORMATION
  • COMMUNITY EVENTS
  • MONSON & MOOSEHEAD REGION ACTIVITIES
  • OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES INFORMATION
    (Moose watching, whitewater rafting, ATV trails, etc.)

LOCATION

Monson Historical Society Building
6 Tenny Hill Road
Monson ME 04464
Phone: 207-573-0163 Appalachian Trail Visitor Center interior

Email: monsonvisitorcenter@appalachiantrail.org
Visit on Facebook: Monson Appalachian Trail Visitor Center

HOURS

Open daily June 6 through October 14
8 AM to 11 AM
1 PM to 5 PM

Facebook Posts

5 days ago

Monson Appalachian Trail Visitor Center

Vaughn Falls hikers: On August 11, Wendy Weiger, Monson A.T. Visitor Center manager and Registered Maine Guide, and Erik Stumpfel, author of A Waterfall Guide to Southern Piscataquis County, led a hike to Slugundy and Vaughn Falls. These two rugged cascades are deep in the woods along the Appalachian Trail in the Hundred Mile Wilderness north of Monson. Here, Erik Stumpfel, Monson Arts Resident Tara Law, Barbara Alhage, and Melinda Mccardell take a break at Vaughn Falls. ... See MoreSee Less

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BE WOODS WISE: When you’re bushwhacking off-trail, it’s surprisingly easy to get disoriented and lose your way. This has happened to many a hiker -- don't let it happen to you! If you head into the woods to relieve yourself, pay very close attention to specific trees, rocks, and other natural features that will serve as guideposts to get you back to the trail when you’re done. And, of course, observe Leave No Trace principles: deposit solid human waste in a cathole dug 6 to 8 inches deep and at least 200 feet from water, campsites, and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole after you’ve finished, and pack out used hygiene products. ... See MoreSee Less

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Yesterday, the Chewonki Foundation’s Traveling Natural History Program came to Monson to teach us about predators and the important roles they play in keeping our ecosystems healthy and well-balanced. Here, “Adder” the milk snake makes friends with Sage, an enthusiastic member of our audience. Milk snakes are native to Maine, but Adder suffered an injury that meant he could no longer live in the wild – so Chewonki offered him a home and a job as a natural history teacher. ... See MoreSee Less

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